I am kind. I am helpful. I want you to see that.

28 November 2017

Hi my name is James Bruce, but people call me Bruce Man.

When I see a photo of myself I see a funny character, ‘cause I’m hilarious – yes I am.

I like watching comedians and especially British comedy, ‘cause everybody laughs.

I make my Nanna Wendy laugh all the time, because that’s what she likes and it’s hilarious. I love to go on the boat with Nanna.

I do it because I like to be helpful. People see me as a funny man but it’s important that people know I am kind and helpful too. I use my humour to help people and I like to help people out, cause that’s what you do.

I’m excited about being on the big screen for this and I want everyone to know I’m funny and hilarious and because everybody knows about that.

I have different voices that I do, I do a Scottish accent and movie characters voices, and they make people laugh too, they come from the mouth.

Making people laugh is easy when you are always having a good time yourself.

I’m 26 years old and I’d like to get a job one day, maybe a bus driver.

I made a photo of the rainforest at Roma Street Parklands called “Like an Intergalactic Movie” which got nominated for the Lord Mayor’s Green Heart Photography Award. I enjoy the exploring and the editing part too. Endeavour Foundation helped me do it. They are also helping me to make a Journey Planner App for people with disabilities. It helps you with which buses to catch and when, ‘cause that’s just what you do.

Chris from Endeavour Foundation is helpful. Me and Chris are funny, man! Some times at Coopers Plains I wear the spectacles and play the virtual learning games. It’s pretty easy once you get the hang of it, yes it is.

 

Find a service near you

Contact us to find out how we can support you

Share:    



Other blogs and information you maybe interested in

Love on the spectrum review

Love on the Spectrum: Season 2 review

Love on the Spectrum is back for season 2!

If you haven’t seen it, it’s a heartwarming show that follows adults with autism as they navigate the unpredictable world of dating. Originally created for ABC, the series has been picked up by Netflix and getting rave reviews. Below is just one of them!

Our resident reviewer Luke from Geebung has written a review of the show:

9 things your support coordinator wants you to know

The job of a support coordinator is to help us understand the NDIS, connect to support services, and understand what our funding can be used for.

You may have funding for a support coordinator in your NDIS plan. If you do, it would be under the funding category ‘capacity building’. There are three levels of funding when it comes to support coordination:

Building confidence: tips for adults with intellectual disability

Confidence can mean believing in yourself, being brave, feeling ready to try new things and feeling happy and proud about who you are.

Self-confidence is your belief in how good you are at something, but it’s not a measure of your actual skill.

What disability looks like according to stock images

Stock library images are popular when telling stories, especially online. They are a nice, warm-fuzzy kinda way to share a visual idea about just about any topic you could dream up. Our Marketing team like to use actual photos of the people and the families that Endeavour Foundation support where we can, but let’s face it, we don’t have a team of paparazzi-style photographers to follow you all around, so sometimes we resort to library shots too.
Disability diagnosis

Disability diagnosis: why it’s so important to get it right

Getting a correct disability diagnosis can take a lot of time, money and paperwork, but it is one of the best things you can do to make the most of your NDIS plan. Your disability support providers can only provide supports that you have funding for. If a diagnosis isn’t quite right, this can sometimes mean that people miss out on the services they need.

Should I say “disabled” or “person with disability”? A guide to person first language

We often get people asking us whether to say ‘disabled person’ or ‘person with disability’. and it’s a tricky one to answer because there’s no hard and fast rule. It essentially comes down to what the people you are referring to prefer