Employable Me review by Amanda

25 June 2018

My name is Amanda and I am reviewing episode one of a documentary series called “Employable Me”. This three part series followed the stories of three inspiring young people looking for work. There was Rohan aged 21, Kayla aged 20 and finally there was Tim aged 28. Each of them faced their own sets of difficulties often due to their various disabilities. Ultimately, everyone featured in the documentary wanted the opportunities in life that everyone has.

What I thought

I felt proud. I was so proud of them for not giving up and being courageous enough to feature in the documentary. This series proves that just because someone has a disability it doesn’t mean they can’t have a job like everyone else.

From my experience I found it hard to get a job in Open Employment and keep it, but with Supported Employment like I have at Endeavour, I am able to keep and maintain my position because Endeavour understands my disability. In my experience Employers/staff members in Open Employment did not. They too can benefit from training. The company in the show that has employed several people with Autism understands what they are capable of and the understanding of the disability. It is rewarding to know that I have now been able to keep my job and progress within it with help, training and support. 

I believe that each and every one of us that has a disability have several outstanding abilities which I think should be targeted when looking for Employment. We all need to stop looking at the ‘disability’ and concentrate on the outstanding ‘abilities’ which we saw in this episode.

My recap of episode 1

First there is Rohan. Rohan was born with Autism. Due to this he finds it hard to get past the interview stage in regards to work. Rohan’s ultimate goal would be to be able to move out on his own, independent from his parents. In a test, he passed a memory exam that only two percent of the population can solve. Also he managed to get a trial position at Scenic World conducting tours of the local bushland. Unfortunately he is currently looking for work.

Secondly there is Kayla. Kayla has Torret’s Syndrome. Because of this she finds it hard to go out in public without negative attention from people around her. Kayla finds music helps her feel free and her dream job is to work in music. Kayla also was given an opportunity to do a trual in a workplace called Rosemount, working backstage. She impressed them and was given a casual position there.

Lastly we have Tim. Like Rohan, Tim also has Autism. Unfortunately, Tim dislikes travelling by himself which has hindered him. Tim has a high school diploma and a certificate in IT. He does receive a position at a gaming company where he will be working in his dream field of IT.

This show proves that if you have a dream in life you should go for it.

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