Carolyn's Story

30 October 2017

Carolyn took time to let you know what’s important to her with this moving v-log story.

Watch the video to find out what she had to share:

TRANSCRIPT:

Carolyn:

My name is Carolyn.

Just because I don’t speak, it doesn’t mean I don’t have anything to say.

It’s hard when you can’t hear what’s going on around you. With time though, it’s become easier.

They say that most communication is non-verbal, so that’s a good thing. I hope people see the person that I am.

I want you to know that I love my family. I’m friendly and loved. I have a lot of friends.

When I set my mind to something, nothing can stop me.

Dad says I’m stoic. I’d do anything for my parents, just as they’d do anything for me.

My favourite things is balloons. I’m happy when I’m holding a balloon.

I also love cats and birds. Dogs are alright, but cats and birds are better.

I remember birthdays and I love to celebrate.

If you told me your birthday, I could tell you what day of the week you were born on.

I love to keep a record of things.

I’m incredibly organised – you should see my diary!

I love work. Yesterday I painted 21 posts.

I started at Endeavour Foundation 35 years ago. I started when I was 18.

I’m a bit like my dad, in that I never want to stop working.

I’ve learnt the value of money, and that’s a very good thing.

I now show dad what to do at the ATM.

I used to struggle with change. Now, I accept things as they are.

I’m a decision maker now.

My mum is proud of my independence.

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