5 things to take when you meet with your NDIS planner

30 January 2018

1. A filled out ‘Mapping my World’ booklet

If you only do one piece of NDIS planning – make it this!

Mapping My World is a free NDIS pre-planning booklet designed to help you get ready for your first NDIS planning meeting.

 

Download now!

2. A list of questions

To make sure you don’t forget anything, we recommend you take a list of questions you want to ask your Planner.

To get you started, we’ve compiled a list of 10 questions that, in our experience, could be useful for you to discuss with your Planner at your meeting.

You’ll no doubt have your own to add to the list, too.

3. Someone to support you

You can have a support person (or people) go along to your planning meeting with you (but you don’t have to – you can just go alone). It’s totally up to you who you take to your Planning meeting.

People usually take a loved one, current service provider or advocate.

We recommend the person you take is all of these things:

  • Someone who knows you very well
  • Someone who has a pretty good understanding of the NDIS
  • Someone who is a good communicator

4. Any relevant documentation

Relevant documentation is really anything that you think will paint a better picture of your needs. This can be related to you, your disability, your health or your current supports.

If in doubt? Bring it along!

5. A positive attitude

No, seriously.

With all the confusion, negative press and uncertainty around the NDIS, it can be really easy to forget that there are positive stories too.

Overwhelmingly we are finding that people are happy with their plans. In fact, 93% of people who have transitioned to the NDIS rate their satisfaction with the NDIA as “good” or “very good”.*

It’s important you go in to the meeting optimistic, prepared and relaxed. Odds are it will go well.

*© National Disability Insurance Scheme Launch Transition agency 2017

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