3 steps: How to ace your NDIS planning meeting

28 March 2018

3 steps: How to ace your NDIS planning meeting

Whether it’s your first, second or even third planning meeting, chances are that there’s a lot at stake for you. You’ll naturally want the meeting to go well so that you get the funding you need from the NDIS.

Here are some steps you can follow to increase your chances of a great outcome.

1. Be prepared

You’ve probably heard this a lot, but the importance of preparation cannot be overstated! The more you prepare, the better your chances at receiving your best funding package.

If it’s your first planning meeting

If you only do one piece of NDIS planning, make it Mapping My World. It is a free NDIS pre-planning booklet designed to help you get ready for your first NDIS planning meeting.

[FREE Download now!]

Also make sure you check out our blog: 5 things to take when you meet with your NDIS Planner.

If it’s a plan review

We’ve got some handy resources around this:

The first port of call should be to check out our blog: how to prepare for your NDIS plan review.

Also make sure you take a look at: 5 things to take when you meet with your NDIS Planner.

2. Be clear with your planner

One of the most important things to remember going in to your meeting is that the NDIS Planner does not know you. They will only know what you tell them.

There are two main things you will need to tell your planner (and yes, they are covered in Mapping My World):

Supports you receive now and why you need them

Think about the supports you currently receive (and of course, it helps to write these down!).

One of the best questions you can ask yourself is ‘what would my life be like without my current supports?’

By communicating this to your Planner, they will be able to better understand what your needs are and how important it is that this support continues.

Your goals for the future and what supports you need to help achieve these.

This is the exciting bit.

It’s your chance to think about what you want from your life, and what your big goals are for the future.

Make sure to tell your planner

  • What your goal is
  • Why it’s important to you
  • And how you see it happening

3. Do what’s right for you

At the end of the day, the NDIS exists to support Australians with a disability.

Make sure you have the right people with you in the meeting and it’s in a place that works for you.

Don’t be afraid to ask for something that better suits your needs. If you prefer to have a face to face meeting and the planner is organising a phone meeting – speak up! Let them know what is best for you.

It’s also worth noting that if the Planner calls at a bad time, you don’t have to have the planning meeting straight away. You can ask them to call you back.

Contact us to find out how we can support you

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