50 years of improving lives in Nambour

11 December 2019

People with intellectual disability and their families today celebrated half-a-century of growth and development opportunities at Endeavour Foundation’ Nambour Learning and Lifestyle (L&L) Hub.

Local Brian Williams has been involved with the program for 42 years and said his favourite things about the service are the staff and community access programs.

“At Nambour L&L we get to go out and do lots of things in the community,” Mr Williams said.

“At men’s shed [staff help me to] to build things and take us out in the bus.”

Endeavour Foundation’s Nambour day service was originally founded in 1969 as a school to provide children with an intellectual disability the opportunity to have an education after they were excluded from mainstream schools.

CEO Andrew Donne said the construction of the service was down to parents fighting for the basic rights of their children.

“During the 1950s and 60s, classrooms were packed due to the post-war baby boom,” Mr Donne said.

“The government of the time denied children with intellectual disability access to state school education to make room for neuro-typical children.

“As a result, some truly inspirational parents took the education of their children into their own hands and Endeavour Foundation branches were formed all over Queensland.

“Nambour didn’t have a school for children with a disability but thanks to community support and the hard work of local families, a school named ‘Sylvania’ was built.”

Half-a-century on from the construction of Sylvania, Endeavour Foundation is still investing in education for people with an intellectual disability with a focus on technology.

“Eventually, the Queensland Government resumed full responsibility for the education of children with intellectual disability and Endeavour Foundation changed to focus on post-school and adult services,” Mr Donne said.

“Today Endeavour Foundation uses innovative Virtual Reality technology and engaging new curriculums focussing on developing life and social skills for the young people and adults we support.

“We’ve come a long way in 50 years but our focus has remained constant; our mission is to imagine what’s possible for people with intellectual disability and partner with them to achieve it.”

Contact us to find out how we can support you

Share:    



Other blogs and information you maybe interested in

Disability Royal Commission Interim Report – Letter to the Editor

I welcome the Disability Royal Commission’s interim report on its first 15 months of operations.

There are many lessons to be learnt from the evidence shared with the Royal Commission by people whose lives have been impacted by violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation.

Australia’s all abilities battle of the bands goes online

 For the first time ever on International Day of People with Disability (3 Dec), Endeavour Foundation’s all abilities Battle of the Bands is going live to the world – online. 
Battle of the Bands has been a live music event for nearly a decade, with performers taking to the stage at locations including The J in Noosa and Brisbane’s iconic Eatons Hill Hotel.

Endeavour Foundation’s $35m to build brighter futures

Queenslanders with disability will gain access to more independent living options, thanks to Endeavour Foundation’s $35million investment in accessible housing.

Results of the 2020 Elected Director Elections

One nomination was received for the single position open for election this year, so the nominee was elected unopposed. The re-elected Director will serve for a term of 3 years commencing from the close of the Annual General Meeting being held on Monday 23 November.

Willow and Ann Marie

For the second time in two months, hearts are breaking around Australia at the news that a person with disability has died, allegedly after a prolonged period of neglect and abuse in their own home.

Talking about taboos is the first step to change

None of us like to hear difficult things.

But for people with intellectual disability, one of the greatest barriers to inclusion comes from the negative attitudes and stigmatising beliefs that persist in society.