5 things people forget

28 March 2018

Do you ever get a feeling after walking out of something important that you forgot to say something?

Or the feeling of needing information and not having it on hand?

We talk to plenty of people after they’ve met with their planner, and here are some common things people regret not saying or bringing with them.

1. To get contact details

A lot of people forget to get the contact details of the best person to follow up with after the meeting.

It often happens that people remember something after the planning or want to send through extra information. It’s important to get the contact details of this person so you know exactly who to talk to.

2. A filled out Mapping My World booklet

If you do one piece of NDIS planning, click below:

 

Map My World

 

This handy resource has been designed to help you not only prepare for your planning meeting, but once you’re in the meeting it’s a great checklist to make sure you haven’t forgotten to say something.

3. A list of questions

Everyone’s NDIS experience will be different, so it’s important that you get the right information for you and your circumstance.

By taking along a list of questions, you’ll be ensuring that you have everything you, as an individual need.

Not sure what to ask? We did a blog ‘10 things to ask in your NDIS Planning meeting’ to get you started.

4. Relevant documentation

Relevant documentation is really anything that you think will paint a better picture of your needs. This can be related to you, your disability, your health or your current supports.

If in doubt? Bring it along!

If you forget to bring it, you can send it through later but it can hold up the process.

Examples of documents we could suggest to people:

Proof of your disability

  • A copy of your pension card
  • A letter from your Doctor
  • A letter from work

Other proof that is good to have:

  • A letter or report from a psychologist
  • Other medical reports
  • School reports

5. To bring someone who knows BOTH the NDIS and the person with disability

If you’re someone who’s prepared and in the know, this might be you.

If you don’t have time, or if the NDIS is just too overwhelming, or if the meeting has snuck up on you, make sure you have someone on your team who you trust and who understands the NDIA.

Many people choose to bring a service provider, family member or friend.

Contact us to find out how we can support you

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