VIDEO SERIES: Things people with autism are tired of hearing

02 April 2019

For world Autism Month, some of our Supported Employees wanted to let people know what they are tired of hearing.

They were brave enough to front up to a camera and bust some myths – it’s well worth a watch!

MYTH: People with autism can't achieve a normal life

MYTH - People with autism dont feel emotions

MYTH - Autism is caused by bad parenting

MYTH - People with autism dont want friends

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