Say no to bullying. For people wtih an intellectual disability.

26 September 2016

Bullying affects people from all walks of life, but research suggests significantly higher rates for people with a disability.

A recent Australian survey showed that 52% of students with a disability had experienced bullying at school (including social exclusion, teasing, threats and intimidation), while an American study of over 7,200 people with disabilities, family members, advocates, service providers and other professionals found that abuse of people with a disability was widespread and often overlooked.

The findings showed that:

  • More than 7 in 10 people with a disability say they’ve been abused
  • Over 60 percent of family members indicated that their loved one with special needs had been mistreated
  • In about half of cases, victims said they experienced physical abuse
  • Nearly 90 percent of those indicated they were verbally or emotionally harmed.

People with a disability can also bully others.

Bullying is not a harmless activity.  It can lead to:

  • Depression and anxiety
  • Decrease in grades/school drop out
  • Loss of appetite
  • Absenteeism from work

We’ve produced the first in a series of Easy Read guides specifically for people with an intellectual disability, with our first one covering understanding and addressing bullying - whether the person is being bullied, is the bully, or is a bystander. 

You can also use this guide to start a conversation about bullying with the person you care for.

Step up and say NO to bullying! For people with an intellectual disability.  

Click on the image below to download your copy.

 

Contact us to find out how we can support you

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